• D'Olier Street Dublin
  • Conservation Architect. Architect Hogan Kepghan Ryan. IRISH TIMES BUILDING 8 to 16 D’Olier Street The project involved demolition of the 1950s printing works, the restoration, repair, change of use, full servicing including partial air-conditioningof the buildings. As lead Conservation Architect the There are 10 protected structures on the site of the development. 8 to 16 D’Olier Street form part of a surviving terrace together with numbers 6 and 7 of residential shops developed to the design approved by the Wide Streets Commissioners. 1 to 5 have been replaced by later buildings. Each residential shop except for the end of terrace 16 is a two bay three-storey over shopfront and concealed basement on a northeast-southwest axis. The original roofs are a double-pitched with a one-storey high parapet to the street front with blank windows, there is a fourth floor on 16. The roofs are covered in a mixture of Welsh quarry and manufactured slates with clay ridge tiles and have rendered stacks with tall chimney pots. The original shopfront, which has survived most intact in number 9 is a classical composition with two door-cases one each for the shop and residence above. Each doorcase has a granite surround with pilasters with Ionic capitals supporting an entablature with a fluted frieze. There is a plain rectangular glass fanlight, a panelled lintol and a further entablature terminating in a granite cornice above. The doors are modern and have eleven recessed panels. There are multi-paned modern timber shop-fronts between the door-cases. A careful examination of the fronts of 11 and 12 D’Olier shows that the facades are modern replacements altered later in the 1980s to match the original facades which were destroyed in a fire in the 1970s. The manufactured bricks are now a reasonable match of the adjoining handmade bricks in colour, the texture and regularity of the sizes are distinguishing features. The granite aedicules, cills, string courses, cappings and cornice match the originals and the difference is the weathering of the older granite. The ground floor granite front is a modern and somewhat austere in design in comparison to the adjoining original shop-front of number ten. Most of the rear façades are rendered but some are faced with a yellow-brown brick in Flemish bond with modern weathered pointing. The rear façade of 11 and 12 is also rendered, it is a story higher and the window openings are modern in proportion and have some steel windows and later modern replacement windows. The window openings to the half landings have semicircular brick arches. The interiors of the residences that have survived reasonably intact have decorative cornices and fine joinery of doors surrounds and some panelled window casings. The houses on D’Olier Street would be considered of historical importance because they represent one of the best surviving examples of an early nineteenth century planned landscape. Numbers 8 to 16 D’Olier Street are an important example of early nineteenth century architecture as well as a key part of the re-alignment of Dublin’s thoroughfares by the Wide Streets Commissioners. The proposed development is a combination of the retention and conservation of the protected structures on the site and the removal of the late twentieth century printing works and its replacement with a contemporary office and retail building linked by a contemporary atrium to the protected structures.
  • 2010